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Thursday, April 16, 2015
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The Brain Injury Association of Tasmania (BIAT) provides relevant and ongoing education and training for our members, disability service providers, people living with brain injury and their family/carers, and other people or services in the community who may work or come into contact with people living with or affected by brain injury.

The Brain Injury Association of Tasmania (BIAT) provides relevant and ongoing education and training for our members, disability service providers, people living with brain injury and their family.carers, and other people or services in the community who may work or come into contact with people living with or affected by brain injury.

Recently updated to ensure they address all the changing trends in the area of ABI, BIAT’s Synapse training modules have been designed to provide participants with a practical toolkit of strategies and skills for their workplace. Our training programs can be delivered in a number of ways and can be customised to suit the needs of organisations, services and individuals. 

Download the full training brochure below.

Synapse Training

Download 2015 training brochure (PDF, 2.2Mb) >
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More News

2017 BIAT AGM

BIAT President, Dario Tomat, cordially invites you to the 2017 BIAT AGM - held on the 5th October 2017, at 83 Melville Street Hobart.

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One-day Workshop: Brain Injury - Causes, Effects, and Behaviour Change

Presented by Mark Lamont, Clinical Neuropsychologist - this one day workshop in both Launceston (30th Oct) and Hobart (31st Oct) offers participants the information to understand the common features of acquired brain injury (ABI), approaches to working with people impacted by ABI, as well as behaviour change following brain injury.

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Research opportunity: Women with traumatic brain injury

Women with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are invited to share their experiences in an online survey and/or interview as part of a research study at the University of Western Sydney.

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