Common Effects of ABI

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How brain injury effects a person

It's important to understand that the number, and severity, of problems resulting from a brain injury will differ from person to person.

A brain injury generally effects a person in two major ways - either cognitively or physically.

Effects often impact a person emotionally and medically as well. What makes brain injury an incredibly complex topic, and difficult to understand, is that the effects of brain injury are rarely the same from person to person.

A brain injury is also potentially one of the most devastating disabilities due to its wide range of effects.

Cognitive effects of brain injury

Cognition is the conscious process of the mind, it is the way we perceive, think and remember.

In general, it's the way we acquire knowledge through perception and learning. Injury to the brain can effect these cognitive processes, and some cognitive problems may vary or develop over time depending on a number of factors.

Why these changes are hard?

Cognitive changes as a result of ABI can be very frustrating due to the fact that they can affect a person's ability to learn new things, to work and to be involved socially.

Common cognitive effects include:
  • Poor concentration;

  • Slowed responses;

  • Lack of insight;

  • Poor short term memory;

  • Lack of initiative;

  • Inflexibility;

  • Poor planning and problem solving;

  • Difficulty understanding speech; and

  • Inappropriate sexual behaviour.

Physical effects of brain injury

Brain injury is often referred to as the invisible disability because many cognitive effects are not always easy to see. A brain injury can still effect a person physically, however.

In general, it's the way we acquire knowledge through perception and learning. Injury to the brain can effect these cognitive processes, and some cognitive problems may vary or develop over time depending on a number of factors.

Common physical effects include:
  • Loss of taste and smell;

  • Dizziness and balance;

  • Fatigue;

  • Epilepsy and seizures;

  • Headaches;

  • Visual problems;

  • Chronic pain;

  • Paralysis; and

  • Hearing problems.

What to do if you think you have a brain injury?

Whilst BIAT isn't a direct service provider and does not employ medical professionals, we can still help.

The Brain Injury Association of Tasmania can provide further information on brain injury to you, or assist in referring not only individuals with acquired brain injury to relevant sources, but also family members, carers and those widely affected by brain injury.

Contact BIAT today to find out how we can help you.

Contact Information

Phone: (03) 6230 9800
Freecall: 1300 BIA TAS (1300 242 827)

Email: enquiries@biat.org.au

Visit: 83 Melville Street, Hobart, TAS 7000

Further information on the effects of ABI

The publication "ABI - The Facts" contains a detailed section on the 'Effects of Acquired Brain Injury'.

This can be found from Page 34 onwards. This section explains what difficulties and impairments may follow an Acquired Brain Injury.

View this publication >